The Buachaille Etive Mor in Winter

Print Title : The Buachaille Etive Mor in Winter
Catalogue No, : SH021-PL
Image Size : 840 x 280 mm
Print Size : 1000 x 432 mm
Media : Fotospeed Metallic Gloss 275 gsm
Ink : Epson Ultrachrome Lightfast

£40.00

About The Image

The Buachaille Etive Mor in Winter
The Buachaille Etive Mor in winter raiment across shallow pools on the River Etive.

The name Buachaille Etive Mor translates to ‘The Great Herdsman of Etive’. Its main summit, Stob Dearg , 1,021 metres (3,351 ft), standing at its northern end is one of the best known and most instantly recogniseable mountains in the Scottish Highlands. The other three summits along the ridge are Stob na Doire, Stob Coire Altruim and Stob na Broige.

Popularly known to climbers simply as ‘The Buachaille’, the reigning peak of Stob Dearg rises as a huge pyramid at the head of Glen Etive above the vast flat expanse of Rannoch Moor. The steep, craggy face of Stob Dearg forms the classic aspect of the mountain when viewed from rock pools on the tumbling waters of the Rivers Etive or Coupall, and supports most of the direct and classic routes of ascent for climbers and scramblers.

Of particular significance in this collection of prints of Buachaille Etive Mor are many features of the mountains that are now legendary in mountaineering history, in particular Curved Ridge, Crowberry Ridge, Crowberry Gully, Ravens Gully, Crowberry Tower and the Rannoch Wall.

The numerous rock pools and waterfalls of the River Etive provide excellent foreground for an image of Stob Dearg, the highest of the five tops that make up the long ridge that penetrates deep into Glen Etive. Whilst most photographers head for a now popular viewpoint beneath the bridge in Glen Etive, I much prefer this location which offers an unparalleled view of the mountain’s great north face and better emphasises its elevation and dominance over the wide expanse of Rannoch Moor below.

This image was captured some forty minutes after another shot available in this collection, namely ‘Alpenglow on The Buachaille‘.